The Royal and Pontifical University of Santo Tomas.

About Us

The war stopped the Boletin’s publication from December, 1941 to January, 1946. After the war, it became a bi-monthly publication under the editorship of Fr. Agapio Salvador who held the office from January, 1946 to April, 1947. In May, 1947, Fr. Juan Ortega was appointed editor. He worked until December, 1956.

In January, 1948, the Boletin reverted to its monthly publication. In January, 1957, Fr. Jesus Merino became the editor and with him the monthly editorial became a regular feature of the Boletin. He remained in office until December, 1960. Fr. Excelso Garcia, presently the Director of the UST Printing Office served the office from January, 1961 to December, 1967.

Prior to 1960, the Boletin was published in Spanish except the official Church documents which were published in English for the benefit of foreign English speaking members of the clergy. In January, 1962, its medium of communication shifted from Spanish to English.

The following had been editors of the Boletin: Fr. Quintin Garcia (1967); Fr. Leonardo Legaspi (January, 1968-December, 1969); Fr. Jose Ma. Tinoko (January, 1970-February, 1971); Fr. Jaime Boquiren (March, 1971-December, 1972); Fr. Pompeyo de Mesa (January, 1973-February, 1974); Fr. Efren Rivera (March, 1974-February, 1983); Fr. Vicente Cajilig (March, 1983-June, 1991 and July, 1995 to present); Fr. Roman Carter (July, 1991-June, 1993); Fr. Honorato Castigador (July, 1993-June, 1995); Fr. Vicente Cajilig (July, 1995-August, 2005); Fr. Rolando dela Rosa (September, 2005-October, 2008); Fr. Florentino Bolo, Jr. (November, 2008-December 2009) and Fr. Norberto Castillo (2010 to present).

The Boletin is published bi-monthly by the University of Santo Tomas. It contains an editorial, documentation, canon law, liturgy, features, cases and inquiries, history and homiletics. Two “sections” of the Boletin Eclesiastico were the most welcome of each issue: the “Casos Y consultos” – cases and consultations – in which questions sent by readers were answered by experts, and the “cronica” – chronicle – which followed up the events of relevance for the Church here and abroad.